An expat Californian building a new life via the tango in Buenos Aires since 2003, including information on learning the tango and where to dance it in Buenos Aires.

Wednesday, February 06, 2008

Barrio Mio -- Bohemian Boedo




The New York Times recently did a travel piece, Rebirth of a Bohemian Barrio, (by fellow blogger Ian Mount from GoodAirs) on my neighborhood of Boedo, sort of as the "new" San Telmo or Palermo, that is to say, up-and-coming and trendy.

Far from being "new," Boedo is old. Boedo is the original historical barrio de tango. The intersection of San Juan y Boedo (2 blocks from my place) was made famous in the tango, Sur, and El Esquina de Homero Manzi, famous for tourist tango shows, has been on that corner since 1927. Two blocks down is El Esquina de Pugliese, which is the discount version of the tango show at Homero Manzi, but it is said that the great orchestra leader used to hang out there.

But if you want to actually dance tango yourself, there are no milongas here. For a month or so last year a couple of new milongas opened just one block from my apartment in the Salon Mallorca, but they didn't last long and are now closed.

Anyway, this N.Y. Times article doesn't address the tango dilemma, but it does cite trendy bars, which of course Ruben and I don't go to. The article does mention our favorite neighborhood restaurant, Cafe Margot, however, which is historical and satisfying.

Testifying to the Bohemian theme of the article, the public art sculpture is touted. But I ask you, just look at these photos. The fences are brand new; was the city afraid of theft??












The Times agrees with me that there is no shopping to speak of, but then they don't know about my little Bolivian fruit stand just around the corner.

But the truly best things about Boedo are not even mentioned in the article: it's safe and quiet (not trendy at all, thank goodness), no hotels or tourist attractions (except for the aforementioned tango shows), and absolutely close to almost everywhere. And no amount of ugly fascist fenced-in sculpture can change that!

More on Boedo at Buenos Aires Weekly.

2 comments:

RealityPivots said...

hi cherie,
i made one brief stop in Boedo lookng for a dance class. it was at night and i didn't explore. all i did was look down a side street and yet the smaller buildings? down that street left me with a desire to see more and perhaps try living there next time. i'm pleased to hear such nice things about it.
david

tangocherie said...

Hi David,
Thanks for your Boedo recollection.
Hope to see you one day soon in the barrio!
Besos!